April 13, 2014
"Too many young women I think are harder on themselves than circumstances warrant. They are too often selling themselves short. They too often take criticism personally instead of seriously. You should take criticism seriously because you might learn something, but you can’t let it crush you. You have to be resilient enough to keep moving forward, whatever the personal setbacks and even insults that come your way might be. That takes a sense of humor about yourself and others. Believe me, this is hard-won advice I’m putting forth. It’s not like you wake up and understand this. It’s a process."

Hilary Clinton, on taking criticism. (via ayabug)

BAMF.

(via herblondness)

giving the best advice, always. serious bamf.

(via apsies)

April 13, 2014

Spring in NYC

7:41pm  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/Zl4HYy1CzHNnv
  
Filed under: nyc grass is greener 
April 11, 2014
"

The rising price of education changes us at an existential level, forcing young people and their parents to apply a cost-benefit analysis to learning. The prospect of a lifetime of student loan remittances will turn anyone into homo economicus looking for a return on investment.

You might have a passion for philosophy or dream of being an investigative journalist. But computer science or public relations are more likely to pay the bills, so you change your major – indeed, your whole life – accordingly.

Is that selling out or just trying to survive?

"

— Astra Taylor, “Don’t hate on millennials for selling out. Start forgiving their student loan debts,” The Guardian (via gracebello)

(via gracebello)

April 9, 2014
"Common Core testing prepares our students for what they’ll face as adults: pointless stress and confusion."

STEPHEN COLBERT, The Colbert Report (via inothernews)

April 6, 2014

I should leave it alone but you’re not right
I should leave it alone but you’re not right
I should live in salt for leaving you behind

Tell us a little bit about the lyrics to “I Should Live in Salt.”

I write all the lyrics, and this one was sort of inspired — very much inspired — by my younger brother, Tom, who’s nine years younger than I am. And he was on my mind a lot while we were making this record because he was living with my wife and I at the time. Still — actually still does. So he was on my mind and in my house. But he came on tour with us when we were touring for High Violet and made a film [Mistaken for Strangers] about his experience there, which is, which was — it’s a complicated movie. We’re very different brothers. Whereas I might be kind of buttoned-up and ambitious, he’s more lax in his approach to the universe, I guess. We love each other a great deal, but there’s often a lot of conflict between the two of us.

And there’s some fun imagery in one of the verses: “Can you turn the TV down? You should know me better than that.”

The lyrics to that are like a bunch of little fragments of thoughts about him. And, truthfully, it’s about us actually getting to know each other as adults, because I went off to college when he was a little kid. He was 9 when I was 18 and went off to college, and then I moved to New York after that. And he kind of went his own — a different path.

 I felt a lot of guilt, because I think [he] needed an older brother the most when you start hitting your teens, and that’s when I sort of took off and disappeared on him a little bit. I mean, we’ve been close our whole lives. But then, when he came and joined us on the tour as a roadie, it was the first time we were spending a lot of time together as adults. And it was a big shift in our relationship and trying to figure out how to love each other and respect each other as adults — not just this much older-younger brother sibling dynamic. So the song kind of is a reflection on all of that.

And you said you felt a little guilt, but the chorus is, “I should live in salt for leaving you behind.” 

Honestly, that was just kind of an abstract image or something in my head and I don’t know. I think Lot’s wife turned to salt when she looked back at the city. I think they used to pack bodies in salt. So there’s not specifically any meaning into it directly, but it seemed like a bad thing to have to live in salt. A lot of my lyrics are approximate meaning without me knowing why they sound right.

[x]

(Source: Spotify)

April 6, 2014
neurosciencestuff:

The Best Longreads on Autism
Autism rates have skyrocketed in recent years, according to recent data from the Centers for Disease Control. Much of that has to do with our growing awareness of the disorder. But despite what we are learning about the possible origins and causes of autism, which has no cure, it continues to frustrate and perplex.
In honor of Autism Awareness Month, we’ve compiled a list of longform journalism pieces that give glimpses into the world of those diagnosed with the disorder, and the struggle of those who love and care for them. In one, a father figures out the secret to connecting with his autistic son. In another, we meet the first person ever diagnosed with the disorder. Bookmark these four deep dives into the world of autism, and take your time to read them throughout the month.
“Reaching My Autistic Son Through Disney,” The New York Times Magazine
“Catch Me If You Can,” Outside
“Navigating Love and Autism,” The New York Times
“Autism’s First Child,” The Atlantic

neurosciencestuff:

The Best Longreads on Autism

Autism rates have skyrocketed in recent years, according to recent data from the Centers for Disease Control. Much of that has to do with our growing awareness of the disorder. But despite what we are learning about the possible origins and causes of autism, which has no cure, it continues to frustrate and perplex.

In honor of Autism Awareness Month, we’ve compiled a list of longform journalism pieces that give glimpses into the world of those diagnosed with the disorder, and the struggle of those who love and care for them. In one, a father figures out the secret to connecting with his autistic son. In another, we meet the first person ever diagnosed with the disorder. Bookmark these four deep dives into the world of autism, and take your time to read them throughout the month.

Reaching My Autistic Son Through Disney,The New York Times Magazine

Catch Me If You Can,” Outside

Navigating Love and Autism,” The New York Times

Autism’s First Child,” The Atlantic

April 1, 2014
"Who wants to see life as it is? It’s the three Gorgons in one. You look in their faces and turn to stone. Or it’s Pan. You see him and you die — that is, inside you — and have to go on living as a ghost."

Eugene O’Neill, Long Day’s Journey Into Night (via lifeinpoetry)

Replace life with loans lol

April 1, 2014
"When she thinks to herself in her father’s language, she knows sons and daughters don’t leave their parents’ house until they marry. When she thinks in English, she knows she should’ve been on her own since eighteen."

Sandra Cisneros, The House on Mango Street (via amfores)

(Source: yesixicana, via lifeinpoetry)

March 31, 2014
digg:

If you’re a Dodgers fan, you may want to try it at a little league game. (via)


I would be so pissed if my fiancé spent 2500 on proposing at dodgers stadium. Maybe if he spent the 2500 buying me all the nachos, dodger dogs, and sodas…. HE HE HE

digg:

If you’re a Dodgers fan, you may want to try it at a little league game. (via)

I would be so pissed if my fiancé spent 2500 on proposing at dodgers stadium. Maybe if he spent the 2500 buying me all the nachos, dodger dogs, and sodas…. HE HE HE

(via meredithhaggerty)

3:10pm  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/Zl4HYy1BkYepH
  
Filed under: proposal food 
March 26, 2014

blueklectic:

Whooooooa the notes!

(Source: youknowyouwantsit)